The Origin in England

The Camplin Family was well known for its Navy supplies and had shops in London and Portsmouth, founded by Edgard Camplin in 1850. Later it was actually Edgard’s dynamic son who started supplying uniforms to the Royal Navy in 1888. He started to offer, not only canvas cloth for sails, but also cloth and uniforms for the British Navy. The Royal Navy demanded something particular: to make the whole military attire uniform (hence the word Uniform which at the time meant clothing suited to the military status). As this need evolved, Mr Camplin also created his own particular style in clothing. This is the reason why many people feel he was the inventor of the Royal Navy Peacoat, which was later adopted by the most important Naval forces and customized in each case.

1850

Original Royal Navy Peacoat

Mr Camplin was well-known for supplying uniforms to the Royal Navy. It was in fact his idea to suggest the use of the Peacoat as part of the Petty O cer’s uniform. Up until then Petty O cers had the same uniform as ordinary able seamen. However they needed their own uniform to make the distinction but something that would be more practical than the Great Coat which senior O cers had. Mr Camplin than came up with the idea of a jacket, having the same important style as a coat but the practical ease in movement of a jacket. So the P. O cers got their P.Coat (P for Petty in Petty O cer) which then for phonetic reasons became the word Peacoat.  is is the story behind why Mr Camplin is rightly believed by many to be the inventor of the Peacoat.

The Cordage

This is a short length of cord used as an extension for buttoning up the double breasted jacket. The cordage was used in colder climates when the layers of clothing under the uniform meant that the jacket couldn’t be buttoned up using the buttonhole. Each seaman had his own cordage made to measure for his sea voyages.

The General Naval Service

This silver medal with its blue ribbon with green stripes was awarded to civilians in British Colonies in recognition of their particular distinguished service in work, their initiative and diplomacy.  They were people who often left an indelible mark on the Colony.

1893

The Origin in England

The Camplin Family was well known for its Navy supplies and had shops in London and Portsmouth, founded by Edgard Camplin in 1850. Later it was actually Edgard’s dynamic son who started supplying uniforms to the Royal Navy in 1888. He started to offer, not only canvas cloth for sails, but also cloth and uniforms for the British Navy. The Royal Navy demanded something particular: to make the whole military attire uniform (hence the word Uniform which at the time meant clothing suited to the military status). As this need evolved, Mr Camplin also created his own particular style in clothing. This is the reason why many people feel he was the inventor of the Royal Navy Peacoat, which was later adopted by the most important Naval forces and customized in each case.

1850

Original Royal Navy Peacoat

Mr Camplin was well-known for supplying uniforms to the Royal Navy. It was in fact his idea to suggest the use of the Peacoat as part of the Petty O cer’s uniform. Up until then Petty O cers had the same uniform as ordinary able seamen. However they needed their own uniform to make the distinction but something that would be more practical than the Great Coat which senior O cers had. Mr Camplin than came up with the idea of a jacket, having the same important style as a coat but the practical ease in movement of a jacket. So the P. O cers got their P.Coat (P for Petty in Petty O cer) which then for phonetic reasons became the word Peacoat.  is is the story behind why Mr Camplin is rightly believed by many to be the inventor of the Peacoat.

The Cordage

This is a short length of cord used as an extension for buttoning up the double breasted jacket. The cordage was used in colder climates when the layers of clothing under the uniform meant that the jacket couldn’t be buttoned up using the buttonhole. Each seaman had his own cordage made to measure for his sea voyages.

The General Naval Service

This silver medal with its blue ribbon with green stripes was awarded to civilians in British Colonies in recognition of their particular distinguished service in work, their initiative and diplomacy.  They were people who often left an indelible mark on the Colony.

1893

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